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Peta Brady, Open2Study blog writer

Knowing how to handle yourself in a conflict situation isn’t always easy, and if you’re not careful things can become heated pretty quickly. Whether at school or in the workplace, maintaining a level of professionalism and coming to a resolution that works for everyone involved is key, and one of the best ways to achieve this is through negotiation.


But not everyone is a born negotiator, and that’s where we come in.

Open2Study’s free online Negotiation and Conflict Resolution course provides a solid foundation for successful negotiation tactics, and introduces you to a range of techniques for resolving everyday conflicts using a practical framework. Throughout the course you’ll learn how to navigate the different phases of conflict, apply communication strategies in a variety of situations, and explore the origins of human conflict. 

Requiring only 2‐4 hours of study per week, you’ll have the basics down in no time and be able to tackle common workplace and day‐to‐day life conflict situations with renewed confidence.

For more information and enrolments, head to our website: https://www.open2study.com/courses/negotiation‐and‐conflict‐resolution

 

 


Peta BradyThis post is by Open2Study's blog writer, Peta Brady.

Peta Brady is a freelance copywriter, editor, social media enthusiast, and general grammar pest. She loves writing scribbles and correcting errors, as well as changing her hair colour every five minutes and eating all the foods in Melbourne.

Contact Peta at www.theword.bird.com.au or on Instagram @thewordbird_.

Peta Brady, Open2Study blog writer

English is a complicated language, thanks to its many irregularities, conflicting rules and weird exceptions. Spelling mistakes are easy to make, but we all make them, and that’s how we learn!

 

With this in mind, I thought I’d share 10 of the most common spelling errors.

 

1. Lose / Loose

These must be two of the most frequently confused words out there. To lose something indicates loss. Add an extra ‘o’ and you’ve got yourself a loose tooth – it’s the opposite of tight.

 

2. Calendar not Calander

This one I suggest saying out loud before writing it down. Give it a try: “I keep appointments in my CAL‐EN‐DAR.” For some reason it always seems to stick.

 

3. Commitment not Comittment or Committment

Confession: this almost always trips me up. And I can’t even think of a clever trick to help me remember. Thankfully it’s a word spell check picks up!

 

4. Definitely not Definately

There is no A in definitely, and remembering this is definitely worth your time.

 

5. A lot not Alot

Alot is not a word. Try thinking, ‘there’s a lot of space in outer space’, to remember to add a space.

 

6. Broccoli not Brocolli

Embarrassingly, I made this mistake for a long time! Thankfully no one was proofreading my shopping list… Apparently broccoli contains both vitamin C and calcium – which is helpful in remembering the double C.

 

7. Weird not Wierd

So much for the ‘I before E except after C’ rule! Just one of the many exceptions out there. How to remember? Well, don’t you think it’s weird that wierd doesn’t follow the standard rule?

 

8. Stationery / Stationary

I think we’ve all made this mistake. Stationery contains an E for envelope. Stationary, meaning not moving, does not.

 

9. Separate not Seperate

 

But they both look correct. Argh! This one I remember from primary school, although the trick doesn’t make a whole lot of sense when I really think about it. But we’ll run with it: there’s a ‘rat’ in separate.

 

10. Dessert / Desert

Thought I’d end on something sweet… Get it? Dessert (that you eat) requires two s’s, and is twice as nice as the dry old desert.


Peta BradyThis post is by Open2Study's blog writer, Peta Brady.

Peta Brady is a freelance copywriter, editor, social media enthusiast, and grammar pest. 

Contact Peta at www.theword.bird.com.au or on Instagram @thewordbird_.

Peta Brady, Open2Study blog writer

Working as a team is a great way to get things done and achieve common goals, yet establishing and maintaining an effective team can sometimes be a challenge. Working in a group of diverse humans with different personalities and backgrounds can quickly result in a dysfunctional group if you’re not careful, making it difficult to achieve anything at all.

 

Check out our top 5 tips for working effectively in a team.

 

1. Appoint a strong leader

A team without a leader is bound to go nowhere. In order to succeed, you need a leader who is comfortable with delegating tasks, and who can provide direction as needed. A good leader will put the needs of the team before the needs of the individual team members, and offer a boost of morale should things start to go off track.

 

2. Clarify goals, roles and responsibilities

It’s vital that everyone on the team is clear about why the team exists in the first place, and what their individual role is within the team. This needs to happen before any work commences, so you can avoid overlapping of tasks and clashes over authority. Once everyone is clear on the goals on the team and what they need to deliver, you can move forward with everyone on the same page.

 

3. Assign the right tasks to the right people

Everyone has their strengths and weaknesses, so it’s important to make sure you’ve got the right person working on the task that best suits their strengths as an individual. You can always make changes to allocated roles once work gets underway, if you feel that a particular task might have been better suited to another team member.

 

4. Encourage open and honest communication

Teams who communicate openly and honestly stand a much better chance of success, as all members have the opportunity to express their ideas and discuss any challenges. Innovation is also much more likely to occur when everyone isfree to be creative and explore alternate options, which in turn increases team morale.

 

5. Be supportive of your teammates

A team in which all members are operating individually and not supporting each other is unlikely to achieve the common goals as laid out at the beginning of the project. It’s important that all members are focused on the end goal, and are able to ask for help when needed. There is no point in one team member completing all of their tasks when others are falling behind – the key to success is to support one another, and to be willing to lend a hand to ensure the project is completed.


Peta BradyThis post is by Open2Study's blog writer, Peta Brady.

Peta Brady is a freelance copywriter, editor, social media enthusiast, and general grammar pest. She loves writing scribbles and correcting errors, as well as changing her hair colour every five minutes and eating all the foods in Melbourne.

Contact Peta at www.theword.bird.com.au or on Instagram @thewordbird_.

Peta Brady, Open2Study blog writer

 

With winter behind us it’s time for some fun in the sun, and also for one of my favourite things: the annual spring clean. So, let’s check the desk. Is it buried under an overwhelming pile of last semester’s notes? Littered with post‐its and old coffee cups? Generally untidy?

Yep, right here. Guilty as charged.

But before you go getting all down on yourself for not acing the study area cleanliness test, instead take this as an opportunity to make a change for the better. After all, it’s hard enough to get into study mode without being surrounded by mess, and a little cleaning never hurt anyone, did it?

Step 1: Get clean.

Before you do anything else, grab some cleaning supplies and give your desk and general study area a thorough clean. Coffee stains, be gone! With a nice clean slate you can move on to decluttering, and getting yourself organised.

Step 2: Get systematic.

Re‐organising your study space is a great way to increase motivation, and spring is the perfect time to make a few changes. Of course, everyone has their own personal preference when it comes to organising notes and the like, so choose a system that works for you. You can try sorting by academic subject, by semester or date, or with categories such as ‘class notes’ and ‘exam preparation’.

Once you have your system in place, go through all your notes and bits of paper, file anything that is needed (or could be useful in the future), then get busy shredding and recycling whatever’s leftover.

Step 3: Get inspired.

It’s always handy to feel inspired when working or studying, so keep this in mind when creating or updating your space. A mood board, fresh paint colour, or a simple houseplant can make all the difference. The aim is to create a quiet, functional space that you enjoy being in.

Now that you’re all sorted, it’s time to get productive. Happy studying!


Peta BradyThis post is by Open2Study's blog writer, Peta Brady.

Peta Brady is a freelance copywriter, editor, social media enthusiast, and general grammar pest. She loves writing scribbles and correcting errors, as well as changing her hair colour every five minutes and eating all the foods in Melbourne.

Contact Peta at www.theword.bird.com.au or on Instagram @thewordbird_.

Peta Brady, Open2Study blog writer

scrabble-tiles-spelling-word-blog

 

So, you’ve decided to start a blog. Great! Not only is blogging a fun and easy way to share your thoughts and ideas with the world, but setting one up is also relatively simple, requiring just a few steps to get started.

 

Step 1: Choose your topic

Blogging without a clear purpose can be confusing for readers, who might quickly decide to spend their time elsewhere. When you select a topic that interests you, your enthusiasm will come across in your writing and make for a much more enjoyable read.

 

Step 2: Choose a platform

There are many blogging platforms available, with the most widely used being Wordpress. Wordpress is easy to use, and offers many templates with varying design functionalities. The free option is tempting, but is limited in capability when it comes to design. If you want to create something unique – and use a custom domain name – you’re better off paying. If you’re not keen on Wordpress, check out Blogger or Tumblr.

 

Step 3: Choose a host & domain name

Before you start writing, you’ll need somewhere to host your site. Hosting is a service that allows your website to be displayed on the internet. Kind of like an online hard drive where your blog is saved. There are many providers in the market, so base your decision on stability, reputation, and cost. This is also the time when you’ll choose your domain name, which will typically be the same or at least similar to your blog title.

 

Step 4: Design, write, promote

This is where the fun starts! Now you can begin designing and personalising your blog, writing your first post, and of course, promoting it to as many people as possible. Social media is your best friend for promotion, with many blogging platforms allowing you to post directly from your blog to Facebook or other social accounts.

And basically, that’s it! If you’re after some inspiration, head over to the O2S website and check out some of our student blogs: https://blog.open2study.com/

 


Peta BradyThis post is by Open2Study's blog writer, Peta Brady.

Peta Brady is a freelance copywriter, editor, social media enthusiast, and general grammar pest. She loves writing scribbles and correcting errors, as well as changing her hair colour every five minutes and eating all the foods in Melbourne.

Contact Peta at www.theword.bird.com.au or on Instagram @thewordbird_.

Peta Brady, Open2Study blog writer

Picture of a book with glasses

As I’m sure you all know, the lead up to exams can be a stressful time. But with a little preparation you can set yourself up to achieve the best possible results. So forget cramming, and try these tips instead.

1. Start studying well in advance

Leaving things to the last minute will only lead to unnecessary stress, so make sure you give yourself plenty of time to study. If you can, find out what material will be included in the exam so you can focus your efforts.

2. Visualise

Reading straight from a textbook is bound to put you straight to sleep, so instead, try something a little more visual. When revising for a topic, identify the areas you need to focus on then condense the information into a diagram, chart or picture. You are more likely to remember an image than a clump of text.

Group of friends studying picture

3. Bring a friend (or two)

Studying with friends is a great way to test your knowledge, and share it! Just make sure you stick to one topic at a time, and ask each other as many questions as you possibly can – it’s possible they have some of the answers you’ve been looking for.

4. Plan your day

There’s no point in all this study preparation if you miss the bus and don’t make it to your exam in time. Before the day arrives, make sure you’ve got everything you need ready to go, your timing sorted, and your transport organised. Arriving barely on time and frazzled isn’t the best mindset to start off with.

Picture of healthy sandwich and orange juice

5. Eat right, drink up

Energy and focus is key during exam time, and even though a big serving of sugar might seem like a good idea to help you power through, you’ll be better off snacking on healthy brain foods, and drinking plenty of water. Check out some healthy eating ideas from my previous post: Planning to succeed: A student’s guide to healthy eating.

 

Good luck!


Peta BradyThis post is by Open2Study's blog writer, Peta Brady.

Peta Brady is a freelance copywriter, editor, social media enthusiast, and general grammar pest. She loves writing scribbles and correcting errors, as well as changing her hair colour every five minutes and eating all the foods in Melbourne.

Contact Peta at www.theword.bird.com.au or on Instagram @thewordbird_.