Subject

Latin American Music: Translating Cultural Sensibilities

by Maria Celina Bortolotto and Leonel Alvarado
Overall course rating 96%
1. The course was interesting.
4
2. The course was sufficiently challenging.
3.5
3. The course enabled me to achieve my learning objectives.
4
4. I had a clear idea of what I was expected to do in this course.
4

How Latin American music reflects Latin American identity issues and historical, political and social influences.

Course starts on:

20/11/2017

Course ends on:

19/12/2017

825 students have taken this course

2,763 videos have been watched

404 classroom posts

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What's it about?

In this course, you’ll be introduced to four twentieth-century Latin American musical styles – tango, bolero, salsa and Trova.

You’ll gain an understanding of their links to key social and political events in Latin American history. By the end of this course you’ll be able to demonstrate an awareness of Latin American musical culture, reflecting on cultural sensibilities in relation to history, society and language.

In this course, you’ll be introduced to four twentieth-century Latin American musical styles – tango, bolero, salsa and Trova.

You’ll gain an understanding of their links to key social and political events in Latin American history. By the end of this course you’ll be able to demonstrate an awareness of Latin American musical culture, reflecting on cultural sensibilities in relation to history, society and language.

What's involved?

Module 1Tango
10 videos, 9 quizzes, 1 assessment20 Nov - 26 Nov
Module 2Bolero
10 videos, 9 quizzes, 1 assessment27 Nov - 3 Dec
Module 3Salsa
10 videos, 9 quizzes, 1 assessment4 Dec - 10 Dec
Module 4Trova
10 videos, 9 quizzes, 1 assessment11 Dec - 17 Dec

What will I learn?

• What Latin American musical culture is
• The way music reflects key events in Latin American history, from the late nineteenth century to the nineties
• Four of the key Latin American styles developed through these periods
• How to identify and recognise different instrumental and stylistic shifts in these styles of music

Where could this lead me?

If you're wondering what your future could look like in this area, here are some potential careers you could head towards.

Trade, tourism and diplomatic relations between New Zealand, Australia and the Hispanic world are on an upward trend. By majoring in Spanish your knowledge of Spanish language and culture will prove both valuable and rewarding. A degree majoring in Spanish makes a wide range of career choices possible, including:

  • Banking
  • Journalism
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Teaching
  • Trade and export
  • Travel and tourism

Still looking?

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Who are the instructors?

  • Maria Celina Bortolotto

    Celina Bortolotto is a Senior Lecturer in the Spanish Programme at Massey University of New Zealand. Celina is interested in exploring the interrelation between cultural values and individual emotions as it is represented in literary fiction.

    Celina Bortolotto is a Senior Lecturer in the Spanish Programme at Massey University of New Zealand. Celina is interested in exploring the interrelation between cultural values and individual emotions as it is represented in literary fiction. Her research uses a particular interdisciplinary approach to read and interpret the relation between emotions (especially shame and humour) and cultural identities in contemporary fiction from the Caribbean, Latin America and the U.S., bringing together literary criticism, psychoanalytical research and postcolonial and gender theory. She is currently working on a book-length project on Argentinian humourist Roberto Fontanarrosa. Celina teaches courses on Advanced Spanish language, Translation, Spanish Phonetics and Hispanic Literature.

  • Leonel Alvarado

    Originally from Honduras, Leonel Alvarado lived in the United States before moving to New Zealand, where he coordinates the Spanish Programme at Massey University and teaches Latin American literature, travel writing, and popular music. He has published several award-winning books of poetry, fiction and criticism.

    Originally from Honduras, Leonel Alvarado lived in the United States before moving to New Zealand, where he coordinates the Spanish Programme at Massey University and teaches Latin American literature, travel writing, and popular music. He has published several award-winning books of poetry, fiction and criticism. His latest book explores the relationship between music, nationalism, migration and identity through the national anthems of Central America.

50 students are taking this course