Subject

Marine and Antarctic Science (Marine)

by Professor Craig Johnson and Dr. Jess Melbourne-Thomas
Overall course rating 93%
1. The course was interesting.
4
2. The course was sufficiently challenging.
3.5
3. The course enabled me to achieve my learning objectives.
3.5
4. I had a clear idea of what I was expected to do in this course.
3.5

Over 70% of our planet is ocean, and life itself evolved in the sea so come and join us on this tour of Planet Ocean!

Course starts on:

07/09/2015

Course ends on:

06/10/2015

7,817 students have taken this course

36,271 videos have been watched

2,259 classroom posts

Enrol now ...It's free!

What's it about?

Have you ever wondered about the diversity of marine biota in our oceans? Do you know what a nudibranch is? Or how a kelp forest functions? Did you realise that the ocean ‘pumps’ carbon? Are you interested in how marine systems; from coral reefs to Antarctic ecosystems are managed?

Have you ever wondered about the diversity of marine biota in our oceans? Do you know what a nudibranch is? Or how a kelp forest functions? Did you realise that the ocean ‘pumps’ carbon? Are you interested in how marine systems; from coral reefs to Antarctic ecosystems are managed?

This course will introduce you to the fascinating world of our oceans. You will learn about marine life and key features of the ocean system. You will also explore some of the stressors on marine systems caused by human activity. Finally, this course will cover how society might sensibly approach managing those threats into the future.

What's involved?

Module 1Marine Life
8 videos, 7 quizzes, 1 assessment7 Sep - 13 Sep
Module 2The Ocean System
10 videos, 9 quizzes, 1 assessment14 Sep - 20 Sep
Module 3Climate Change and Multiple Stressors
10 videos, 9 quizzes, 1 assessment21 Sep - 27 Sep
Module 4Stewardship of the Oceans
9 videos, 8 quizzes, 1 assessment28 Sep - 4 Oct

What will I learn?

  • How life has evolved in the sea
  • How marine food webs are structured
  • How some particularly interesting ecosystems function such as kelp forests, the Antarctic ocean, and the deep sea
  • What oceanographers do and some of the technologies they use
  • What drives plant growth and thus ecosystem productivity in the oceans
  • The role of the ocean in shaping and regulating our climate
  • How plate tectonics shape the ocean basins and influence current patterns
  • Consequences of climate change for ocean processes and marine biota
  • How fishing and other human pressures affect ocean systems
  • How seafood is likely to be an important food source in the future
  • How we monitor and manage marine ecosystems

This course requires approximately 2 - 4 hours of study per week, but can vary depending on the student. This includes watching videos, and taking quizzes and assessments. The total video time for this course is approximately 4 hours 59 minutes.

If you pass this course you'll receive a Certificate of Achievement. While this certificate isn't a formal qualification or credit, you can use it to demonstrate your interest in learning about this area to potential employers or educational institutions.

Where to from here?

If you love this course, why not take your studies further? Here are some accredited qualifications that could help you achieve your goals.

Where could this lead me?

If you're wondering what your future could look like in this area, here are some potential careers you could head towards.

  • Oceanographer or other marine scientist
  • Fisheries scientist or other marine biologist
  • Ecotourism
  • Public policy
  • Marine manager

Still looking?

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Who are the instructors?

  • Professor Craig Johnson

    Craig is a marine community ecologist and Director of the Marine and Antarctic Futures Centre in the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at the University of Tasmania.

    Craig is a marine community ecologist and Director of the Marine and Antarctic Futures Centre in the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at the University of Tasmania.

    His research is broadly concerned with the dynamics of temperate and tropical reef communities and Antarctic pelagic systems, as well as the science that underpins responsible management of marine systems. Craig works about equally with marine animals and algae, and his research is divided between field work, strongly focused on conducting ecological experiments underwater, and building computer models of marine system dynamics. His research is published in over 120 peer-reviewed publications including two edited books.

  • Dr. Jess Melbourne-Thomas

    Jess is an ecological modeller with the Australian Antarctic Division and the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre. She has always had a passion for the marine environment and feels privileged to be in a career where she can follow this passion.

    Jess is an ecological modeller with the Australian Antarctic Division and the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre. She has always had a passion for the marine environment and feels privileged to be in a career where she can follow this passion. Jess has worked on coral reef ecosystems in Indonesia, the Philippines and Mexico, and more recently has been working on Southern Ocean ecosystems. She still enjoys diving on tropical reefs, which provides a good balance to the chilly temperatures of field work in Antarctica.

236 students are taking this course